Playing in my Sandbox

A while ago, Paizo decided to continue what TSR started with Dungeon magazine and publish dedicated Adventure Path’s which are essentially 6 installments of a campaign that would take you from first level to around 15th level (give or take some levels depending on how it goes). From the outside looking in, it looks like . . . → Read More: Playing in my Sandbox

Playing the Race Card

There are quite a few RPGs available where you can play a non-human race (or alien). Outside of the RPG realm, it also has a significant presence in books and shows (the latter more in sci-fi shows/movies). However RPG games like A Song of Ice and Fire (based on novels and then a tv show), . . . → Read More: Playing the Race Card

The Art of Character Flaws

Last week, when I spoke of redemption and how it could play out for a role-playing game, Sean Holland (Sea of Stars) spoke up about liking to play flawed characters. Some RPG systems have built-in systems for handling character flaws. In these systems, you can usually take on flaws that open up more ways to . . . → Read More: The Art of Character Flaws

Redemption!

What crosses your mind when you read the word “Redemption”? There are obvious and not so obvious ways to look at that word and its meanings and then apply it to gaming. While there are religious overtones to the word, at its heart is someone trying to overcome a past failure.

A player character trying . . . → Read More: Redemption!

Into the Unknown

Even without monsters, the world is full of challenges. Exploring jungles, deserts, land near the North/South Poles can be trying even for the most prepared parties. Reading about the early explorers of Antarctica and how they fared is a great example. There are even TV shows dedicated to people trying to survive in the wilderness. . . . → Read More: Into the Unknown

Dungeons & Dragons’ Legacy

The D&D system will always hold a fondness for me. It was my introduction to roll-playing and then (as I became more sophisticated) role-playing. It allowed me to play in worlds that were inspired by authors like J.R.R. Tolkien, Fritz Leiber, and Robert E. Howard (among many others). While I owe a great debt to . . . → Read More: Dungeons & Dragons’ Legacy

Rise of the Video Games

Back when I was young, I dreamed of the day that computers would be used both as role-playing aids and provide a level of sophisticated games that would be a reasonable substitute for role-playing when a group couldn’t meet. As time marched on, this dream became more and more the reality. However, what I never . . . → Read More: Rise of the Video Games

That *New Game* Smell

They say the first step to resolving an addiction is to admit you have a problem. Well, here’s my problem: I’m addicted to new settings.

I look at new systems whether they are set in an existing RPG framework or a brand new one. I’ll look into systems and worlds whether I’m currently running and/or . . . → Read More: That *New Game* Smell

Starting with a Big Bang

Last week, on the Forged Front, I discussed players thinking about party dynamics before the campaign even starts in attempt to really make it easier for everyone to ease into the long haul for the campaign without having to wonder why their character would put up with another character for any length of time at . . . → Read More: Starting with a Big Bang

The Ties That Bind

A RPG campaign lives and dies with the PCs. A GM can create an interesting setting backdrop, start the campaign off with a bang, and provide compelling reasons to want to explore the campaign world. However, the GM cannot force the PCs to actually stay together. Despite the GM’s best efforts, sometimes the various PCs’ . . . → Read More: The Ties That Bind

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